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  • Orders of Protection | Suffolk County Sheriff's Office

    Orders of Protection Orders of protection are issued by a judge to protect you from another person who is abusing, harassing, threatening, and/or intimidating you, or has committed a crime against you. Orders of protection are commonly issued in cases involving domestic violence, but may also be issued under other circumstances. ​ Types of Orders of Protection Family Court Order of Protection: A Family Court Order of Protection is issued as part of a civil proceeding to stop violence that is occurring within the family or within an intimate relationship. You may begin the process of obtaining a Family Court order of protection by filling out the Family Offense Petition . In order to obtain an order of protection in Family Court, your relationship to the other person involved must fall in at least one of the following categories: Current or former spouse. Someone with whom you have a child in common. A family member to whom you are related by blood or marriage. Someone with whom you have, or have had, an 'intimate relationship.' (An intimate relationship does not necessarily mean a sexual relationship. Family Court will consider several factors such as, but not limited to: "how often you see each other or how long you have known each other.") Criminal Court Order of Protection: An Assistant District Attorney may request a criminal court order of protection on your behalf. You do not need to have an intimate or personal relationship with the person charged with the offense. The judge decides whether to issue an order of protection, as well as the terms and conditions. Supreme Court Order of Protection: A Supreme Court order of protection can be issued as part of ongoing divorce or criminal proceeding. If you are involved in an ongoing divorce case and wish to request an order of protection, you must make a written request by Motion or Order to Show Cause, or an oral request at a court appearance. If an attorney is representing you in the case, the attorney can make the written or oral request on your behalf. The judge decides whether to issue an order of protection, as well as the terms and conditions. Orders of protection may be temporary or final: Temporary Order of Protection: Issued the same day that a complainant files for an order of protection and lasts only until the next court date, at which point it may be extended. Final Order of Protection: A final order of protection is issued when the case results in a conviction (whether by plea or after a trial) in criminal court or in family court after a judge finds that a family offense was committed. Orders of protection may be full or limited: Full Order of Protection: A full order of protection means that the subject of the order of protection must stay completely away from you, your home, job and school, and must not abuse, harass, or threaten you. Limited Order of Protection: A limited order of protection allows the subject of the order of protection to maintain contact with you. However, the subject cannot abuse, harass, or threaten you. Serving Family or Supreme Court Orders of Protection For legal reasons, you may not serve your own order of protection. Orders of protection will be served in court by the judge if the defendant/respondent is present. ​ The Suffolk County Sheriff's Office may serve your Order of Protection. This service is free of charge. Once the Sherriff's Office has served the respondent, they will provide you with a signed statement that says the service has been completed. If the Sheriff's office is unable to deliver the order of protection after several attempts, they must provide you with a signed statement that includes the dates and times of each attempt. ​ An order of protection does not guarantee your safety. It is important that you have a safety plan should the person violate the order of protection. Violating an Order of Protection It is a crime to violate a temporary or final order of protection. If an individual violates the order of protection, you should report it to the police. In an emergency call 911 and the individual will be arrested. In a non-emergency, you may file a violation of the order of protection by going to a police precinct. If you have a Family Court order of protection, you may go to Family Court and file the violation, you may report the violation to the police or choose to do both. If you file a violation of the order of protection only in Family Court, the subject who violated the order might not be arrested. Learn more about an order of protection . ​ ​ ​ Extreme Risk Protective Order Please be advised that effective August 24, 2019 the NYS Supreme Courts may begin issuing an Extreme Risk Protective Order when a person may be dangerous to themselves or others. Please see the New York Courts website regarding how an order may be obtained. ​ ​ An Extreme Risk Protective Order (ERPO) is a court order issued when a person may be dangerous to themselves or others. An ERPO prohibits a person from purchasing or possessing guns and requires the person to surrender any guns they already own or possess. An ERPO can also direct the police to search a person, premises or a vehicle for guns and remove them. An ERPO case may be started by a district attorney, a police officer, a school official, or a member of the person’s family or household. It is a civil case. ERPO cases have no criminal charges or penalties. ​ The petitioner is the person filing the ERPO application with the court. The respondent is the person you are asking the Court to issue an ERPO against. The petitioner can be a district attorney, a police officer, a school official, or a member of the respondent’s family or household. ​ ​ Crime Victims Information Suffolk County Sheriff Errol D. Toulon is pleased to announce that the Sheriff's Office participates in the Order of Protection Notification System (OPNS) . The program is available to anyone who registers to receive alerts regarding Family Court-issued orders of protection in Suffolk County -- and provides a text, email, phone or fax notification to alert victims when Deputy Sheriffs serve a Family Court Order of Protection to a perpetrator on their behalf. Victims can also use the VINE resource to look up inmates and receive alerts regarding their release. Register for alerts by visiting the NYS Sheriffs Institute Victims Services page linked below. Please have your docket number and order of protection number available at the time of registration.​ ​ If you or someone you know is a victim of domestic violence, the following organizations in Suffolk County can offer support and guidance. However, please call 911 if you or someone you know is in immediate danger. To learn more about making an application for a court order of protection, please visit the Unified Court System website. ​ If you need assistance, counseling or advice, call one of the organizations listed below: Crime Victims Center (631) 689-2672 The Retreat (631) 329-2200 Long Island Against Domestic Violence (631) 666-8833 Victims Information Bureau of Suffolk (Known as VIBS) (631) 360-3606 NYS Courts Steps to Apply for an ERPO

  • Inmate Demographics | Suffolk County Sheriff's Office

    Inmate Demographics January 2, 2023 January 9, 2023 January 16, 2023 January 23, 2023 January 30, 2023 February 6, 2023 February 13, 2023 February 20, 2023 February 27, 2023 March 6, 2023 March 13, 2023 March 20, 2023 March 27, 2023 April 3, 2023 April 10, 2023 April 17, 2023 April 24, 2023 May 1, 2023

  • Volunteer | Suffolk County Sheriffs Office

    Volunteer The Suffolk County Sheriff's Office welcomes service providers, non-profit agencies, religious leaders, and volunteers. Please fill out the volunteer application below and email i t to Deputy Warden Christopher Black at: Christopher.Black @suffolkcountyny.gov. ​ You can also send it by mail to: The Suffolk County Correction al Facility C/O Deputy Warden Christopher Black 100 Center Drive Riverhead, NY 11901 ​ Volunteer Application

  • Project Lifesaver | Suffolk County Sheriffs Office

    Project Lifesaver Project Lifesaver is a rapid-response program that aids victims (and their families) who wander as a result of cognitive impairments, or other afflictions. The program combines technology and specially trained Sheriff’s Deputies to locate individuals who have wandered. Project Lifesaver clients wear a “watch-type” wristband transmitter (worn on the wrist, ankle or as a necklace), which emits a tracking signal. When a caregiver calls the Suffolk County Sheriff’s Office Project Lifesaver line to report that a client has wandered, a search team responds to the wanderer’s area and, while in route, activates the vehicles mobile locator tracking system. A hand-held unit is used to search for clients in areas inaccessible by vehicles. ​ ​ In an emergency, caregivers must immediately notify the: Suffolk County Sheriff’s Office Project Lifesaver Emergency Response Line at 631-852-2791 and dial 911. ​ How to Enroll in Project Lifesaver Enrollment applications can be obtained by calling (631) 852-3003. Your enrollment application must be completed and submitted to the Suffolk County Sheriff’s Office at 100 Center Drive, Riverhead, NY 11901. Once your application is reviewed, an appointment will be made for a home visit by a Project Lifesaver specialist from the Sheriff’s Office. ​ How to Purchase Project Lifesaver Equipment The purchase of enrollment equipment is coordinated through the Sheriff’s Office once the client’s application is approved. ​ Cost to Enroll The transmitter, transmitter case, transmitter tester, battery and wristband costs $300.00 (approximately), plus shipping & handling. The battery and wristband has to be changed monthly or bi-monthly (depending on transmitter) and a new battery and wristband installed. This costs about $5.00 each month. ​ Monthly Maintenance Monthly and/or yearly battery and wristband purchases may be requested by calling the Suffolk County Sheriff's Office at (631) 852-3003. ​ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS What is Project Lifesaver? Project Lifesaver is a rapid-response program that aids clients (and their families) who wander as a result of cognitive impairments, or other afflictions. ​ Who sponsors Project Lifesaver? Project Lifesaver is sponsored by the Suffolk County Sheriff’s Office as well as non-profit organizations who make donations to the Suffolk County Sheriff's Foundation for Project Lifesaver. ​ How does Project Lifesaver work? The program combines technology and specially trained Sheriff’s Deputies to locate individuals who have wandered. Project Lifesaver clients wear a “watch-type” wristband transmitter (worn on the wrist, ankle or as a necklace), which emits a tracking signal. When a caregiver calls the Suffolk County Sheriff’s Office Project Lifesaver line to report that a client has wandered, a search team responds to the wanderer’s area and, while in route, activates the vehicles mobile locator tracking system. A hand-held unit is used to search for clients in areas inaccessible by vehicles. ​ How much does Project Lifesaver cost? There is a one-time cost of approximately $300 (plus tax and shipping) for the transmitter, tester, battery and wristband strap. ​ How long does it take to enroll in Project Lifesaver? Applications can be requested by calling 631-852-3003. A Sheriff’s Deputy will then meet with the potential client/caregiver/family member making certain that the area is safe for the potential client and to assist with the necessary paperwork and instructions. ​ How long does it take for the Project Lifesaver program to begin? Once you have met with a member of the Project Lifesaver Bureau and have the necessary equipment (transmitters take up to 2-4 weeks to ship), the program starts immediately. ​ How is the initial equipment purchased? The purchase of Enrollment Equipment is coordinated through the Sheriff’s Office once the client’s application is approved. ​ How is monthly maintenance equipment purchased? Caregiver purchase requests for batteries and wristbands, for monthly maintenance, can be obtained by calling 631-852-3003, or by email at: lifesaver@suffolkcountyny.gov , or through a registered Project Lifesaver International sponsor, or care facility. ​ What happens if someone wanders? Caregivers must immediately notify the Suffolk County Sheriff’s Office Project Lifesaver emergency response line (631-852-2791), and dial “911.” Project Lifesaver Bringing Loved Ones Home How long does it take to locate a missing client? Nationally, response times vary, but average under 30 minutes. ​ How frequently should a transmitter battery be changed? Batteries emit a signal every second (24/7) and must be changed monthly. ​ Is the transmitter waterproof? Yes. Clients can shower and swim while wearing the transmitter. ​ Is the client’s transmitting equipment covered by insurance as a medical necessity? Check with your insurance carrier. If necessary, the Sheriff's Office can provide documentation to the insurance carrier that the client in question is enrolled in the Suffolk County Sheriff's Office Project Lifesaver Program. ​ What happens if something goes wrong with my equipment? Call the Sheriff’s Office Project Lifesaver line immediately (631-852-2791). ​ What happens if the transmitter is lost? Call the Sheriff’s Office Project Lifesaver line immediately (631-852-2791). ​ Are there other Project Lifesaver programs? Project Lifesaver began in the Sheriff’s Office, Chesapeake, Virginia in 1999 and is now in over 1,300 Sheriff and Police agencies across the United States, Canada and Australia. ​ Is there a guarantee that a person wearing a Project Lifesaver transmitter will be located? Client searches involve different variables and incidents are unpredictable. In over 3,000 reported searches, Project Lifesaver agencies have achieved a 100% success rate. The Sheriff’s Office feels Project Lifesaver equipment and established procedures greatly increases the likelihood of “Bringing Your Loved Ones Home” safely. ​ Submit Thank you for your request. Someone will contact you shortly.

  • Human Trafficking | Suffolk County Sheriffs Office

    Sheriff's Anti-Trafficking Initiative The Sheriff’s Anti-Trafficking Initiative was the first of its kind in the country operating from inside a correctional facility. S.A.T.I. has been pioneering the campaign against human trafficking from the correctional standpoint by establishing a comprehensive and effective response to the crime. The unit works in collaboration with federal, state and local law enforcement agencies by developing and forwarding intelligence gleaned from the correctional facility setting. In addition, they refer victims and work closely with advocacy groups in efforts to assist the victims on their road to recovery. The principal objectives are to ensure that all victims of human trafficking who pass through our facility are identified, have access to the services they need to recover, and are supported throughout their long-term journey as survivors. ​ ​ What is Human Trafficking ​ Human trafficking, in general terms, is holding someone in compelled service for labor or commercial sex acts, using whatever means necessary whether physical or psychological (force, fraud, or coercion)​. ​ Causing someone under the age of 18 to engage in a commercial sex act, regardless of using force, fraud, or coercion is human trafficking under U.S. law. ​ Every year, millions of men, women, and children are trafficked worldwide – including right here in the United States. It can happen in any community and victims can be any age, race, gender, or nationality. Traffickers might use violence, manipulation, or false promises of well-paying jobs or romantic relationships to lure victims into trafficking situations. ​ Human trafficking can happen to anyone but some people are more vulnerable than others. Significant risk factors include recent migration or relocation, substance use, mental health concerns, involvement with the children welfare system and being a runaway or homeless youth. Often, traffickers identify and leverage their victims’ vulnerabilities in order to create dependency. Youth and teens can be more susceptible to becoming a victim of human trafficking, especially those who have recently immigrated, those who are displaced from their families or have significant issues in the home, and those who have a history of substance use. Knowing not only the signs of human trafficking but some of the grooming techniques and ways to protect your children are vital to keeping our youth safe. ​ To report suspicious non-emergency human trafficking activity, contact Crime Stoppers at 1 (800) 220-TIPS. For urgent or life threatening situations, or if you suspect someone is in immediate danger, call 911. Here are some signs that someone could potentially b e a trafficking victim: ​ Is the person disoriented or confused, showing signs of mental or physical abuse? Does the person have bruises in various stages of healing? Is the person fearful, timid, or submissive? Is the person often in the company of someone who seems to be in control of where they go or whom they talk to? Does the person appear to have a much older boyfriend or "daddy" that seems to be a strange or uncomfortable relationship? Does the person seem to be being watched or controlled? Does the person appear to be coached on what to say? Does the person lack personal possessions or appear to not have a stable living situation? Does the person seem to be abused or deprived of food, water, sleep, medical care, or other life necessities? Can the person freely contact friends or family and have the means to do so? Is the person allowed to socialize alone? Is the person permitted to freely attend religious services? ​ Please note: It is unsafe to attempt to rescue a trafficking victim. You have no way of knowing how the trafficker may react or retaliate against you or the victim. If you believe you have identified someone who has escaped from or is currently being trafficked, please contact law enforcement immediately. ​ There are several other indicators not listed that could imply someone is a victim of human trafficking, as well as being "groomed" to become a victim. Below are additional resources you can print or look through for more information. ​ Note:The information above was collected from the Suffolk Sheriff's Anti-Trafficking Unit, the National Human Trafficking Hotline, the Polaris Project, and the Department of Homeland Security's Blue Campaign. If you have a tip or think you cause to believe someone may be a trafficking victim, call the Human Trafficking Resource Center at (888) 373-7888 immediately. Download a Free Resource Click on any of the images below to download a FREE informational resource. Use these guides to start the conversation with your children or loved ones about human trafficking, share them on social media or hang them in your school or business to keep the conversation going. Contact Us The Suffolk County Sheriff's Office has designated teams of officers in our Human Trafficking Unit tracking activity within our Correctional Facilities as well as in the community. If you would like additional information or to speak with one of our officers, please fill out the request form below and someone will contact you. Thank you for contacting us. Someone will reach out to you shortly. Submit

  • Mental Health Links | Suffolk County Sheriff's Office

    Mental Health Psychiatric Emergencies CPEP Program at Stony Brook .....................................................................................................(631) 444-6050 Pilgrim Crisis Center (Non-emergency) ....................................................................................... (631) 761-2929 Mental Health Hotline ................................................................................................................... (631) 952-3333 Mobile Crisis Team (Adults & Children) ........................................................................................ (631) 952-3333 Response Hotline ......................................................................................................................... (631) 751-7500 Suicide Prevention Lifeline ........................................................................................................... (800) 273-TALK Talbot House 24-hr. Substance Abuse Crisis ............................................................................... (631) 589-4144 DASH Suffolk County Mobile Crisis Team .................................................................................... (631) 952-3333 Crisis Intervention Domestic Violence Sexual Assault 24-hr. Hotline ........................................................................ (631) 360-3606 Long Island Council of Alcoholism & Drug Dependency ............................................................. (631) 979-1700 APS (Adult Protective Services) .................................................................................................. (631) 854-3195 CPS (Child Protective Services) .................................................................................................. (800) 342-3720 SC Department of Social Services Emergency Services Hotline ................................................ (631) 854-9100 Long Island Crisis Center ............................................................................................................. (516) 679-1111 RESPONSE Crisis Center ........................................................................................................... (631) 751-7500 National Suicide Prevention Lifeline ............................................................................................ (800) 273-TALK COPLINE ..................................................................................................................................... (800) 267-5463 Crisis Text Line ................................................................................................................. Text "BLUE" to 741741 Psychiatric Hospitals Brookhaven Memorial Hospital .................................................................................................... (631) 654-7760 Brunswick Hall (Adults) ................................................................................................................ (631) 789-7130 Brunswick Hall (Children 5-17) ..................................................................................................... (631) 789-7000 Eastern Long Island Hospital ............................................................................................ (631) 477-1000 x5394 Huntington Hospital ...................................................................................................................... (631) 351-2434 Mather Memorial Hospital (Adults 18+) ............................................................................. (631) 473-1320 x5800 Mather Memorial Hospital (Children 12-17) ...................................................................... (631) 473-1320 x5820 Pilgrim Psychiatric Center (NYSOMH) ......................................................................................... (631) 761-3500 Sagamore Children's Psychiatric Center ..................................................................................... (631) 370-1700 South Oaks Hospital .................................................................................................................... (631) 264-4000 St. Catherine of Sienna Medical Center ....................................................................................... (631) 862-3000 Stony Brook Pediatric Emergency Department ............................................................................ (631) 638-3500 Veterans Administration Medical Center ........................................................................... (631) 261-4400 x2785 Brookhaven Mental Health Center Emergency Room Access ..................................................... (631) 447-3048 Information/Referral (Non-emergency) Association for Mental Health & Wellness Helpline ...................................................................... (631) 226-3900 Suffolk Division for Community Mental Hygiene .......................................................................... (631) 853-8500 Department of Social Services Hotline ........................................................................................ (631) 854-9100 NYS Office of Mental Health (OMH) ............................................................................................ (800) 597-8481 Long Island Office of Mental Health ............................................................................................. (631) 761-2508 Brentwood Mental Health Clinic ................................................................................................... (631) 853-7300 Brookhaven Mental Health Center, Shirley .................................................................................. (631) 852-1070 Brookhaven Mental Health Center, Patchogue ............................................................................ (631) 854-1222 Buckman Center, Brentwood ....................................................................................................... (631) 761-3746 Catholic Charities, Bay Shore Center .......................................................................................... (631) 665-6707 Catholic Charities, Medford Center .............................................................................................. (631) 654-1919 Community Counseling Services ................................................................................................. (631) 874-0185 Farmingville Mental Health Center ............................................................................................... (631) 854-2552 Suffolk On Track South Oaks ....................................................................................................... (631) 608-5558 Family Service League, Iovino South Shore Family Center ......................................................... (631) 647-3100 Family Service League, Central Islip Clinic .................................................................................. (631) 663-4300 Family Service League, East Hampton Center ............................................................................ (631) 324-3344 Family Service League, East Yaphank Center ............................................................................. (631) 924-3741 Family Service League, Family Counseling West Hampton Beach ............................................. (631) 288-1954 Family Service League, Mattituck Center .................................................................................... (631) 298-8642 Family Service League, Olsten Family Center ............................................................................. (631) 427-3700 Family Service League, Huntington ............................................................................................. (631) 396-2300 Family Service League, Riverhead Center ................................................................................... (631) 369-0104 Family Service League, Sterlington Commons ............................................................................ (631) 477-4067 Family Wellness Center ................................................................................................................ (631) 273-1300 New Horizons ............................................................................................................................... (631) 257-5173 Hampton Psychological Center .................................................................................................... (631) 255-7715 Hope House Ministries ................................................................................................................. (631) 928-2377 SCO Madonna Heights Services ................................................................................................. (631) 253-3480 Opti Healthcare Mental Health Centers, Meadow Glen Center .................................................... (631) 360-4700 Opti Healthcare Mental Health Centers, Riverhead Center ......................................................... (631) 284-5500 Peconic Center - Pilgrim Outpatient Center ................................................................................. (631) 369-1277 Riverhead Jail Mental Health Unit ................................................................................................ (631) 852-1851 Riverhead Mental Health Center .................................................................................................. (631) 852-1440 Skills Unlimited Mental Health Clinic ............................................................................................ (631) 567-1626 South Oaks Affiliate ...................................................................................................................... (631) 608-5620 ​

  • Civilian Opportunities | Suffolk County Sheriff's Office

    CIVILIAN OPPORTUNITIE There are an array of opportunities available as a civilian employee of the Suffolk County Sheriff's Office including but not limited to: ​ Assistant to the Sheriff Administrative Assistant Public Information Officer Director of Human Resources Director of Personnel/Payroll Assistant Intergovernmental Relations Director Neighborhood Aid ID Technicians Research Analyst Mechanic s Accounting Clerk Payroll/Personnel Jail Cook Public Service Dispatchers Community Relations Coordinator Office Assistant Medical Professionals Mental Health Professionals and many more... Visit the Suffolk County Department of Civil Service here to take a current exam and start the process of joining the Suffolk County Sheriff's Office.

  • Language Line | Suffolk County Sheriff's Office

    Language Line English Visitors Guide SCSO Language Line Directive Project Lifesaver Adult Enrollment Application Project Lifesaver Child Enrollment Application Project Lifesaver Application Instructions Spanish Visitors Guide SCSO Language Line Directive Project Lifesaver Adult Enrollment Application Project Lifesaver Child Enrollment Application Project Lifesaver Application Instructions Chinese Visitors Guide SCSO Language Line Directive Project Lifesaver Adult Enrollment Application Project Lifesaver Child Enrollment Application Project Lifesaver Application Instructions Portuguese Visitors Guide SCSO Language Line Directive Project Lifesaver Adult Enrollment Application Project Lifesaver Child Enrollment Application Project Lifesaver Application Instructions Haitian Creole Visitors Guide SCSO Language Line Directive Project Lifesaver Adult Enrollment Application Project Lifesaver Child Enrollment Application Project Lifesaver Application Instructions Italian Visitors Guide SCSO Language Line Directive Project Lifesaver Adult Enrollment Application Project Lifesaver Child Enrollment Application Project Lifesaver Application Instructions Polish Visitors Guide SCSO Language Line Directive Project Lifesaver Adult Enrollment Application Project Lifesaver Child Enrollment Application Project Lifesaver Application Instructions

  • Salary & Benefits | Suffolk County Sheriff's Office

    Salary & Benefits Correction Officers $49,655 *Includes line-up, shift differential, holiday pay, and cleaning allowance. Starting Salary After 3 Years $64,475 *Includes line-up, shift differential, holiday pay, and cleaning allowance. After 5 Years $79,842 *Includes line-up, shift differential, holiday pay, cleaning allowance, and longevity pay. After 12 Years $124,235 *Includes line-up, shift differential, holiday pay, cleaning allowance, and longevity pay. BENEFITS ​ Suffolk County Correction Officers enjoy a competitive benefits and compensation plan including: ​ Healthy, Vision & Dental Insurance Life Insurance Issued Uniform & Equipment Holiday Pay Rotating Shift Pay Night Differential Clothing Allowance Sick Leave Bonus Tuition Reimbursement Longevity Pay Military Time Credit New York State Pension 25-year Retirement (regardless of age) Time Accruals Deputy Sheriffs $33,000 *Plus additional salary increases as per the 2019 - 2024 contract. Starting Salary After 5 Years $60,386 *Plus opportunities for shift differential, holiday pay, sick leave bonus, and more per the 2019 - 2024 contract. After 8 Years $78,644 *Plus opportunities for shift differential, holiday pay, sick leave bonus, and more per the 2019 - 2024 contract. After 12 Years $102,987 *Plus opportunities for shift differential, holiday pay, sick leave bonus, and more per the 2019 - 2024 contract. Benefits ​ Suffolk County Deputy Sheriffs enjoy a competitive benefits and compensation plan including: ​ Healthy, Vision & Dental Insurance Life Insurance Issued Uniform & Equipment Holiday Pay Rotating Shift Pay Night Differential Clothing Allowance Sick Leave Bonus Tuition Reimbursement Longevity Pay Military Time Credit New York State Pension 20 -year Retirement (regardless of age) Time Accruals

  • FACILITIES | Suffolk County Sheriffs Office

    Locations & Directions Riverhead Correctional Facility 100 Center Drive South Riverhead, NY 11901 (631) 852-2200 Directions to the Riverhead Correctional Facility: From the Long Island Expressway traveling east to exit 71. Make a right at the stop sign (heading east) for about 4 miles. Watch for the Correctional Facility on the right. From Sunrise Highway traveling east take exit 61. Follow the signs to County Rd 51- Riverhead. At Route 24 make a left. Go approximately a ¼ mile and watch for the Correctional Facility on the left. Yaphank Correctional Facility 200 Glover Drive Yaphank, NY 11980 (631) 852-2200 Directions to the Yaphank Correctional Facility: Take the Long Island Expressway to exit 67, Yaphank Avenue, and travel south for approximately 1.25 miles. Make a right onto Glover Drive. The Correctional Facility entrance is located at the end of Glover Drive. Civil Enforcement Bureau 360 Yaphank Avenue Yaphank, NY 11980 (631) 852-5600 Directions to the Civil Enforcement Bureau: Take the Long Island Expressway to exit 67, Yaphank Avenue, and travel south for approximately 0.75 miles and the Civil Enforcement Bureau will be on your right.

  • Operations Division | Suffolk County Sheriffs Office

    OPERATIONS DIVISION The Operations Division of the Suffolk County Sheriff's Office ​includes Employee Benefits, the Communications Bureau, the Quartermaster, the Grants Bureau, Accounting, Personnel Investigations, Personnel/Payroll, Fleet Management, and Research & Development. The Operations Division is overseen by the Chief of Staff. Employee Benefits Accounting Department Communications Bureau Personnel Investigations Grants Bureau Payroll Department Research / Development Fleet Management Employee Benefits Established in November 2000, Employee Benefits is an Administrative Section overseen by the Employee Relations Director to execute the personnel and human resource functions of the Sheriff’s Office and assist in implementing Office policy related to personnel issues. Personnel files for all current and former employees are maintained in this office according to the Sheriff’s guidelines. The Employee Relations Director assists in representing the Sheriff at contract negotiations, grievance and arbitration hearings and labor management meetings. The Director oversees the implementation of the terms and conditions of all the Sheriff’s Office employee contracts. ​ The Employee Benefits Section administers all benefits for employees as negotiated by the three bargaining units within the Sheriff’s Office: the Suffolk County Association of Municipal Employees, the Suffolk County Correction Officers Association, and the Suffolk County Deputy Sheriffs Police Benevolent Association. All enrollments and changes in employee benefits, such as health insurance, benefit fund, life insurance and the retirement system are processed to keep all Sheriff’s Office employees benefits up to date. Prospective retirees receive pension estimates and benefit information to prepare them for retirement. All employme nt verification requests are certified and employees are assisted and advised regarding any problems encountered with their benefit providers. Beneficiary, marital, family, and address changes are routinely processed by the Employee Benefits Section. Compliance with the Family and Medical Leave Act, the Fair Labor Standards Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act is also monitored and ensured. Employee benefit information is provided in a seminar format to each group of new and prospective Deputy Sheriff and Correction Officer candidates. Canvassing, interviewing, and participating in the selection process to fill vacant civilian positions are all a part of fulfilling the duties of the Employee Benefits Section. ​ ​ Communications Bureau The Communications Bureau is responsible for administering the Sheriff’s Office 911 and dispatching functions. The Bureau also provides support for the Corrections Division of the Sheriff’s Office in addition to numerous Federal, State and local agencies when needed. In 2019 the Bureau issued 15,321 blotters to the Sheriff’s Office Deputy Sheriff Units. ​ The Communications Bureau is comprised of 12 Public Safety Dispatcher I’s, 3 Public Safety Dispatcher II’s and 1 Public Safety Dispatcher III. The PSD’s are also responsible for the entry and updating of Orders of Protection, transmitting and receiving of messages through the eJustice Integrated Portal, conducting criminal history checks and preserving and cataloging all radio and telephone communications within the Bureau. ​ ​ Grants Bureau The Grants Bureau was established in 1993, with the mandate to locate state, federal and private sector funding opportunities. We investigate the aptness of funding programs for Sheriff’s Office initiatives, complete or assist in the completion of grant applications of interest to appropriate sections within the Office and render technical assistance to other agencies applications upon request. After receiving an award, the Grants Bureau writes all legislative paperwork and is responsible for all reporting requirements. ​ ​ Research / Development ​ The Sheriff's Office has developed an organized system of information storage, retrieval and review which is part of the overall research and decision making capacity, relative to both inmate and operational needs. This bureau facilitates decision making, research and timely responses to inquiries. It is concerned with the total flow of data tha t reaches the administrative staff to assist them in planning future policy and direction and to control resources and activities. ​ While the primary goal of the Research and Development Bureau is to provide statistical, legal and budgetary information for use in making management decisions, the bureau is also designed to perform five distinct functions: Coordinate and Formulate the Office’s Annual Operating and Capital Budget Requests On-going Sheriff’s Office research; Information for Administrative/Management decision making; Inmate population statistics; and Rapid response to ad hoc inquiries. Collecting statistical information about the inmate population has long been a responsibility of this bureau. Using the inmate population and other data collected, this bureau is responsible for refining and analyzing this information in order to assist in identifying specific problem areas and broad correctional trends. These research endeavors have provided critical feedback and will create a broader, more solid base on which to develop correctional policy. The bureau consists of a Lieutenant and a Principal Clerk, who are responsible for completing all of the tasks assigned to it over the course of the year. ​ ​ Accounting Department ​ The Accounting Bureau prepares the annual operating budget request for submission to the County Executive’s Budget Office. Our office is responsible for disseminating the adopted budget to the various units within the Sheriff’s Office, and maintaining oversight of departmental spending to ensure that spending remains in accordance with the budget throughout the year. All purchases of goods and services are initiated through the Accounting Bureau either by direct purchase or via Suffolk County Purchasing by entry of a requisition for a purchase order. In 2019, our office processed 2,064 direct purchases and entered 613 requisitions, which resulted in our office processing 2,677 payment vouchers for vendor invoices. ​ ​ Personnel Investigations Bureau ​ The Personnel Investigations Section is responsible for conducting confidential background investigations on all employee candidates for the Sheriff’s Office. In addition to Sheriff’s Office employees, i.e. Deputy Sheriffs, Correction Officers and civilians, this section also investigates all other county employees, volunteers, interns, e tc. who enter the Correctional Facility. We also do investigations for employee candidates for other departments. ​ Depending upon the position an individual is being investigated for, inquiries are sent to all, or some, of the following, as applicable: numerous police agencies, New York State Department of Mental Health, military, schools and past employers. F.B.I. and D.C.J.S. fingerprints are also taken for each individual. We additionally make an internal inquiry, within our agency, on all individuals being investigated. The internal inquiry consists of a record check, within the various sections of our Office, i.e., Radio Room, B.C.I., Record Room, Civil Bureau and Internal Affairs. For Deputy Sheriff and Correction Officer candidates an enormous amount of time (clerical and investigative) is spent preparing for and holding seminars, as well as conducting the background investigations. Numerous interviews, i.e. employers, neighbors, spouse, family, etc. are conducted regarding candidates for these positions. A limited background investigation is provided for all other individuals. ​ ​ Payroll / Personnel ​ The primary mission of the Payroll/Personnel Bureau is to ensure that all employees are paid accurately and in a timely fashion. In 2019, the Payroll/Personnel staff consisted of 7 full time Civilians, 3 of which are new to the Payroll/Personnel Bureau. The Payroll/Personnel staff prepared and distributed 21 special and 26 bi-weekly payrolls totaling to $1.73 Million and paid, on average, 1,297 employees in 2019. The Sheriff’s Office is composed of employees in the following bargaining u nits: the Suffolk County Deputy Sheriff’s Benevolent Association, the Suffolk County Correction Officers Association, the Association of Municipal Employees, as well as Bargaining Unit 21 which includes all Management Personnel. ​ The Payroll/Personnel Bureau is responsible for maintaining the Sheriff’s Office Position Control pursuant to Civil Service Rules and Regulations, implementing all salary changes for current employees that may take place due to assignment/shift changes or promotions, processing all new hires on the on the County Payroll System, PPS, as well as processing all the employees who separate from service. Processing these separations involves pro-rating accruals, as well as pre-auditing six years of time and accruals to be paid out. This information is then sent the Suffolk County Department of Audit & Control for final audit and approval of accrual payouts. ​ In addition, the Payroll/Personnel Staff is responsible for validating leave taken, tracking donated accruals, military time, half pay eligibility and usage, checking attendance rosters, overtime payments, computing accruals, running regular and special payrolls, employment verifications, reporting wages to the New York State Employees Retirement System, as well as, maintaining a personnel/payroll file on each employee, where all paperwork is scanned and retained on the Sheriff’s Office confidential servers. ​ ​ Fleet Management ​ Fleet Services is responsible for the maintenance of the “Fleet” which includes patrol vehicles, unmarked and undercover vehicles, trucks, buses, ATV’s, boats, military surplus equipment, and military vehicles. We practice strict adherence to NYS DMV standards of repairs. We perform preventative maintenance on every vehicle, maintain records such as daily check list, and ensure officer safety. Fleet staff strives to stay current with industry knowledge in order to maintain the equipment with efficiency. We are always performing preventative maintenance in order to prolong the life of each piece. Fleet Service is also responsible for ensuring that the Suffolk County Sheriff's Office vehicles and equipment meet the federal, state, and county safety and regulatory mandates. Our additional responsibility is for the purchase, design, and upfit of new vehicles. We also track cost and time of the repairs with a state of the art fleet management software program. ​ We have developed a relationship with “ARI,” an independent national wide automotive company, that helps us service our vehicles should they have a mechanical breakdown outside our geographical area. The staff of fleet services is also responsible for the towing, recovery, and impound of vehicles. We are responsible for snow removal from the Riverhead facility parking lots. ​ Fleet Services is called upon to work closely with other county departments, outside law enforcement agencies, U.S. government and the NYS DMV. In addition, we are called upon to negotiate with the county fleet liaison for the amount and dollars needed to update and maintain the fleet of vehicles. Fleet Services is also responsible for the monitoring of vendors who do our outside repairs ( i.e. collision work and heavy truck repairs). Employee Benefits Communications Bureau Grants Bureau Research / Development Accounting Department Personnel Investigations Payroll/Personnel Fleet Management

  • History | Suffolk County Sheriff's Office

    Suffolk County Sheriff's Office History The origin of the Sheriff is traceable to the Office of the Sheriff and Constable of early English history. On Long Island, from 1664 to 1683, ridings were used to establish boundaries within the Shire. The East riding comprised the territory now occupied by Suffolk County. The West riding consisted of Kings County and Newtown (Queens). The remainder of Long Island belonged to the North riding. Collectively, the three ridings were called Yorkshire. ​ The Governor appointed a “High Sheriff” for Yorkshire with a Deputy from each riding. In 1683, the ridings were abolished and the East riding became Suffolk County. The High Sheriff was no longer necessary being that each County would now have its own Sheriff. Suffolk County’s first Sheriff was Josiah Hobart in 1683. ​ After the American Revolution, the practice of the Governor appointing a Sheriff continued and was incorporated into the first Constitution adopted in New York in 1777. At the Constitutional Convention in 1821, the appointed Office of the Sheriff was made elective. That year, Abraham Gardiner became Suffolk County’s first elected Sheriff. ​ Today, the Sheriff of Suffolk County is elected to the term of four years. On January 1, 2018, Dr. Errol D. Toulon, Jr. became the 67th Sheriff of Suffolk County and the County`s first African American Sheriff in Suffolk County history. ​ Please scroll through a pictorial history of the the Suffolk County Sheriff's Office. History of the Suffolk County Jail Facilities The first Suffolk County Jail was erected in 1727 on the north side of Main Street in Riverhead at the site of former Perkins store. A bronze plaque placed there by the Suffolk County Historical Society marks the site. This jail was severely damaged during the Revolutionary War and had to be rebuilt in 1784. Continuous enlargements and improvements were made throughout the next 75 years until a new site on Griffing Avenue was purchased and a court house and jail built of brick and stone was erected in 1855. This jail was a separate two story octagonal stone building located at the rear of the court house. The cells were also arranged in an octagon, each cell going back almost to a point with the floor resembling the shape of a piece of pie. It was enlarged in 1881, adding a third floor to this unusually shaped building. In 1911, a new jail was built after the state deemed the octagon jail "unsanitary, overcrowded, and a breeding place for immorality - a relic of the dark ages, a disgrace and a stigma upon the county." The massive stone blocks used in the old octagon jail can be found around the flag pole at the current Riverhead Correctional Facility, comprising a monument to fallen officers and deputies. The 1911 jail was designed to hold 136 inmates but quickly grew to over 200 inmates with overflow housed in the Nassau County Jail at $4.50 per inmate per day. Once again, age and overcrowding turned the 1911 building into a substandard jail falling short of the minimum standards set by the State Corrections Department. In 1961, the Yaphank Penal Farm Building (Honor Farm) was opened. The main reason for erecting this facility was to relieve the overcrowding at the County Jail in Riverhead. However, by locating this building in close proximity to the County Farm, the county saved the time and expense of transporting the inmate farm workers to and from the Riverhead Jail on a daily basis. Work on the Suffolk County Farm was performed almost exclusively by the inmates. This provided the men with a healthy environment and a sense of self-respect. Moreover, the farm provided about 80% of all food consumed at the Suffolk County Jail, the Children's Shelter, the County Infirmary, and the Honor Farm Annex itself. The 1965 inspection of the Suffolk County Jail, conducted by the State Commission of Correction, pointed out the need for construction of a new jail with enlarged and modern facilities. Groundbreaking for the new jail took place on March 15, 1966. Three years later, on January 24, 1969, the state certified the cells for occupancy. However, due to lack of adequate staff, the new jail was not operational until August 28, 1969, when the 190 inmates from the 1911 jail were transferred to the new modern jail. In an effort to boost the morale of the department, in 1977 Sheriff Finnerty requested that the name of the Suffolk County Jail be changed. Therefore, by an act of the Suffolk County Legislature, the jail was renamed the Suffolk County Correctional Facility, while the Honor Farm was renamed the Suffolk County Minimum Security Correctional Facility. In 1980, due to ongoing overcrowding, a 200 bed addition was approved for the Minimum Security Facility in Yaphank. Overcrowding continued, however, despite this addition, and a 300 additional cells were added to the Riverhead Correctional facility creating a Medium Security addition. In 2013, a major addition was added to the Correctional Facility in Yaphank including six pods consisting of 60 cells each. A modern medical unit, medical housing unit, visiting area, and booking and processing unit were also added. This changed the facility from the Suffolk County Minimum Security Correctional Facility to the Yaphank Correctional Facility. Both the Yaphank and the Riverhead Correctional Facilities could now house inmates of all three security classifications. Suffolk County Sheriffs Throughout History 1. Josiah Hobart 1683-1701 2. John Mulford 1701-1702 3. Hugh Gray 1702-1710 4. John Brush 1710-1718 5. Daniel Youngs 1718-1723 6. Samuel Dayton 1723-1728 7. William Sell 1728-1730 8. Joseph Smith 1730-1731 9. David Corrie 1731-1734 10. Jacob Conklin 1734-1740 11. Thomas Higbe 1740-1774 12. James Muirson 1774-1785 13. Thomas Wickes 1785-1787 1791-1799 14. Silas Halsey 1787-1791 15. Phineas Carll 1799-1803 16. Josiah Reeve 1803-1807 1808-1810 1811-1812 1813-1814 1815-1819 17. Phineas Smith 1807-1808 18. Benjamin Brewster 1810-1811 1812-1813 19. Nathaniel Conklin 1814-1815 20. Samuel Carll 1819-1821 21. Abraham Gardiner 1821-1826 1829-1832 22. Samuel Smith 1826-1829 23. Richard Smith 1832-1835 24. Silas Horton 1835-1838 25. Samuel Miller 1838-1841 26. David Brush 1841-1844 27. Henry Penny 1844-1847 28. David Rose 1847-1850 29. John Clark 1850-1855 30. Samuel Phillips 1855-1856 31. George Carman 1856-1859 32. Stephen Wilson 1859-1862 33. Daniel Osborn 1862-1868 34. George Smith 1868-1871 35. J. Henry Perkins 1871-1874 36. Egbert Lewis 1874-1877 37. George Cooper 1877-1878 38. Robert Petty 1878-1883 1888-1891 39. Selah Brewster 1883-1886 40. Henry Halsey 1886-1888 41. A.M. Darling 1891-1897 42. Benjamin Wood 1897-1900 43. J. Sheridan Wells 1900-1903 44. Henry Preston 1903-1906 45. John Wells 1906-1909 46. Charles Platt 1909-1912 47. Melville Brush 1912-1913 48. D. Henry Brown 1913-1914 49. Charles O'Dell 1914-1917 50. Amza Biggs 1917-1920 1923-1926 51. John Kelly 1920-1923 52. Burton Howe 1926-1929 53. Ellis Taylor 1929-1932 54. Joseph Warta 1932-1935 55. William McCollom 1935-1938 1942-1957 56. Jacob Dreyer 1938-1941 57. John Levy 1941-1942 58. Charles Dominy 1957-1962 59. Frank Gross 1962-1970 60. Philip Corso 1970-1976 61. Donald Dilworth 1976-1977 62. John Finnerty 1977-1986 63. Eugene Dooley 1986-1990 63. Patrick Mahoney 1990-2002 65. Alfred C. Tisch 2002-2006 66. Vincent F. DeMarco 2006-2018 67. Dr. Errol D. Toulon, Jr. 2018- Current

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